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IMAGINE A WORLD WHERE

This interactive installation is a conversation about our values. Informatics faculty were asked to describe an aspiration that drives their research and teaching. We now invite you, the Informatics community, to consider these statements and tie together the ones that capture your imagination. Together, we’re creating a dynamic web that speaks to who we are and where we’re headed.

STEP 1: Read all the statements. Pick some that move you. 3-5 is a good number.

STEP 2: Pick up the spool.

STEP 3: Release the spool by turning the small dial counter-clockwise.

STEP 4: Pull the string taut and wrap it around the knobs associated with your chosen statements. Wrap clockwise, going around each knob at least one turn. (If in doubt, wrap it again. Try to keep the string taut throughout.)

STEP 5: Wrap the last knob 3-4 times. This will keep the string from coming loose.

STEP 6: Lock the spool by turning the small dial clockwise.

You’re done! Thank you for taking part.

Research-Creation Support Materials

Western University Research Mobilization, Creation, and Innovation Grant

Lindsay Bell, in collaboration with Jesse Colin Jackson

Please find below samples of artistic work that illustrate our qualifications and the nature of our proposed research-creation project.

Four-Channel Immersive Video

Four-channel video work-in-progress documentation. 2017.

In all locations, the Mackenzie Place art installation will be anchored by a four-channel immersive video. Over the course of five years, the environments and activities of Hay River, Northwest Territories, Canada were captured using four cameras mounted on the tower’s roof. The weather, celestial, pedestrian, commercial, and industrial patterns captured will be presented in various configurations, ranging from linear time-lapse to curated juxtapositions of specific conditions and events. The compiled footage will aggregate the carousel of space and time the building and its diverse inhabitants experience. As befits its position in the local imaginary — omnipresent, though often ignored — the building is seemingly erased from the town in the video, remaining present only as a shadow, rotating across the projection screens. Because Hay River is just below the Arctic Circle, the shadow will evolve from a single shimmering moment on the winter solstice, to a complete rotation around all four screens on the summer solstice, and back again.

Still Images, Plain and Composite

The video will be enhanced and extended by still images assembled on the surrounding walls. Some will be plain stills, e.g. images of the tower from various vantage points in town, near and far.

Others will make use of digital compositing methods. Time Overlays represent the experience of time at a specific site as a single still image product. Each composite is created through the compilation of a linear sequence of information derived from time-lapse photography. The composites are, at first glance, indistinguishable from conventional still photographs, but the information they contain represents the occupation of and interactions within a space over a length of time. The amount of time ranges from several minutes to several hours, depending on the subject matter. Each Time Overlay incorporates dynamic information from 16-32 instances, thus presenting, simultaneously, parallel experiential narratives — the actions of any featured protagonists do not account for the presence of neighbors in time. The method reveals the vitality of the space under scrutiny and creates surreal representations that begin to suggest its defining characteristics.

Time Overlay outside the tower. Digital composite image. Capture 2012, processing 2013.

Space Overlays are composite images that represent the experience of repeated built forms found at multiple sites, again as a single still image product. This repetitive information might include tract housing, portable trailers, branded structures, sidewalks and roads, commercial and industrial equipment, parked vehicles, and other urban infrastructure specific to the north. Each composite is created through the transparent overlay of six to twelve photographs. Consistent elements reinforce each other through repetition, while inconsistencies, such as the surrounding environment and human subjects appear ghost-like. Space Overlays privilege ubiquitous forms of urbanity found throughout a single urban environment or across several urban environments. The method reveals how our visual world is organized around architectural anchors, by conflating the self-reinforcing narratives of repeated built forms with the unique circumstances of their occupation and of their surrounding environments.

Space Overlay of Hay River housing. Digital composite image. Capture 2012, processing 2013.

CUBITS @ SMES


From April 26 to April 29, 2018, I was the Artist-in-Residence at St. Margaret’s Episcopal School in San Juan Capistrano, California. This film documents the interaction of K-12 students with the CUBITS prototype, culminating in the collaborative assembly and disassembly of “Daughter of Boris.” Many thanks to Jesse Standlea, Department Chair of Visual Arts, for organizing this opportunity.

Highlights:

  • 0:50 – 1:00: Kindergarten kids (it’s pajama day!) play with CUBITS.
  • 1:10 – 1:20: Older students build mini-sculptures, organized into a pop-up exhibition along the right wall.
  • 1:50 – 2:35: With the help of several groups of students, I 3D scan a clay sculpture (the dark grey ring), and create CUBITS simulations of it at several different scales. 
  • 2:40 – 4:27: Over the course of two days, I assemble “Daughter of Boris,” the largest CUBITS human figure that has been created so far.
  • 4:52 – 5:54: Sorting and boxing. (Surprisingly fun!)

CUBITS Disclosures


Marching Cubes Made Physical and Tangible Publication Record

Jackson, Jesse, and Luke Stern. “Pixels in the Material World: Making Marching Cubes.” In Proceedings of the 26th Annual Symposium on Electronic Art. Montreal: ISEA, 2020. Conference proceedings. Forthcoming.

Jackson, Jesse, and Luke Stern. “Marching Cubes Made Physical.” In Recalibration: On Imprecision and Infidelty: Projects Catalog of the 38th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture, edited by Philip Anzalone, Marcella Del Signore, and Andrew John Wit. Mexico City: ACADIA, 2018. 234 – 239. Exhibition catalog.

Jackson, Jesse. “Marching Cubes Made Tangible.” In the Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interactions. Stockholm: Association for Computing Machinery, 2018. 592 – 597. Conference proceedings.

Jackson, Jesse. “Speculative Prototyping: Making Plastic Printing Playful and Sustainable.” In The 3D Additivist Cookbook, edited by Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke. Chapter. Amsterdam: Institute of Network Cultures, 2016. 51 – 53. Chapter.

Jackson, Jesse, and Luke Stern. “Fabricating Sustainable Concrete Elements: A Physical Instantiation of the Marching Cubes Algorithm.” In Synthetic Digital Ecologies: Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture, edited by Mark Cabrinha, Jason Johnson, and Kyle Steinfeld. San Francisco: ACADIA, 2012. 239 – 247. Conference proceedings.

Jackson, Jesse and Luke Stern. “Automatic/Revisited: Fabricating Sustainable Concrete Elements.” In Crisis as Catalyst: Architecture, Landscape, and Design Annual 2008 – 2009, edited by Nelson Cheng, Ya’el Santopinto, and Shannon Wiley. Toronto: University of Toronto, 2010. 26 – 27. Article.

Jackson, Jesse and Luke Stern. “Automatic/Revisited: Fabricating Sustainable Concrete Elements.” In MAS Context: University Works, edited by Iker Gil and Andrew Clark. Chicago: MAS Studio, 2010. 138 – 141. Visual essay.


Marching Cubes Made Physical and Tangible Exhibition History

Word and Image in Dialogue. Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach, January – February, 2020. Installation.

Multiple Contingencies. Open Gallery, OCAD University, Toronto, November 15 – 18, 2018. Part of the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts. Interactive performance.

Beyond Convergence. Stockholm Kulturhuset, Stockholm, March 20, 2018. Part of Twelfth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interactions. Interactive performance.

Marching Cubes 1728. Experimental Media Performance Lab, Irvine, January 7 – 9, 2019. Interactive performance.

Marching Cubes Assembly #28 (Gravity-Inflected Spherical Void). Platform 28 for Art & Architecture, Tehran. May 19 – Jun 9, 2017. Installation.

Marching Cubes: Boris. Patkau Project Space, Vancouver, April 8 – 10, 2017. Interactive performance.

Marching Cubes Assembly #18 (Untitled). Arts Brookfield Grace Building, New York, January 17 – March 10, 2017. Installation.

Marching Cubes. Pari Nadimi Gallery, Toronto, November 17, 2016 – January 14, 2017. Installation.

Marching Cubes. Experimental Media Performance Lab, Irvine, October 20 – 22, 2016. Interactive performance.

Automatic/Revisited. Latitude 44 Gallery, Toronto, January 18 – February 28, 2013. Part of Toronto Design Offsite 2013.

Automatic. Larry Wayne Richards Gallery, Toronto, January 12 – 23, 2009.


G.G. Marie (in Colour)

90 images of Marie Jackson (1921-2018) on her 90th birthday. October 8, 2011. Prince George, British Columbia.

See also G.G. Marie in B&W.

 

G.G. Marie (in B&W)

9 images of Marie Jackson (1921-2018) on her 90th birthday. October 8, 2011. Prince George, British Columbia.

See also G.G. Marie in Colour.